Marseille, Capital of Inadequate Housing

100,000 residents of Marseille live in substandard housing.

This represents around 40,000 places of residence.

Half of Marseille’s housing stock is over 50 years old.

In France, housing is a right.

  This right is upheld by the DALO law for the Enforceable Right to Housing (Droit au logement opposable).
In Marseille, in 2018, only 1,514 DALO pleas for poor housing were filed (to recall, there are 40,000 substandard housings identified in this municipality). Among these pleas, 20% were recognised as priority cases. Among these, when the case highlighted a violation on the part of another party – the landlord, or even the state and authorities – the Departmental Commission in charge systematically refused the file.

5 city councillors have been revealed to be landlords of unfit housing.

Féderick Bousquet, Xavier Cachard, André Malrait, Bernard Jacquier, and Thierry Santelli. Despite this, they retained their mandates. One notable addition, Jacques Ansquer, former director of the city’s Food Bank, then Head of citizen housing meetings(!), managed to get to the head of a non-commercial real estate company, Augias (you couldn’t make it up), which rented out many unfit studios.

+118%

 

This is the percentage increase in the number of secondary residences in recent years, compared to a 5% increase for primary residences.

 

Each year, 2,500 social housing allocations are missing in Marseille.

25% of Marseille’s housing stock needs to be social housing, as ordered by the law on Solidarity and Urban Renewal for urban areas of over 3,500 inhabitants.

In Marseille, building works are well financed for well-off areas. In the city centre, building façades are very important.

If your building is located on emblematic streets, such as Rue de Rome, Rue de la République, and others, the City of Marseille will finance up to 50% of the building restoration works.

In 2017, out of the 1,400 building hazards reported to the city council, 57 were taken into account by the city.

In 2019, over 500 requests concerning building hazards were referred to the administrative tribunal.